Charlotte Perriand

The emergence of women designers and architects certainly came full force in the 20th century. We all know of Ray Eames, but right up there among the elite is Charlotte Perriand (1903-1999). (For a brief read on 9 prominent women designers, click the image link below.)



Legendary Women Designer of History An Airgora Editorial.
9 Legendary Women Designers of History Every Designer Should Know, An Airgora Editorial.

 

Even with just a casual knowledge of mid-century modern design, one might recognize a chair designed with the collaboration of Le Corbusier and Pierre Jeanneret, which you might associate entirely with Le Corbusier.

 

LC4 Chaise Longue Designed by Le Corbusier, Charlotte Perriand and Pierre Jeanneret
LC4 Chaise Longue, Designed by Le Corbusier, Charlotte Perriand and Pierre Jeanneret in 1928, Made Popular by Cessina in 1965.

 

Charlotte Perriand was born in Paris in 1903 to a tailor and a seamstress. In high school, she was noticed by an art teacher and with encouragement from her mother enrolled in the Ecole de L’Union Centrale de Arts Decoratifs in 1920 where she studied furniture design. By 1925, she had projects installed at the Exposition Internationale des Arts Decortifs et Industriels Modernes.

Perriand favored the industrial qualities of steel and metals, seen at the time as in the masculine purview. After she graduated, using aluminum and steel she created the Bar Sous Le Toit or Bar in the Attic in 1927 which became installed at the Salon d’-Automne.

 

Salon d'-Automne
The Bar Sous Le Toit Installed at the Salon d’-Automne in 1927.



Siège pivotant (1927), Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris
Siège pivotant, Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris, 1927.

 

Having been enthralled with the ideas of Le Corbusier, she appealed to work in his studio and was famously rejected with, “We don’t embroider cushions here!” Nevertheless, after Le Corbusier attended an exhibition of her work at the Salon d’-Automne, the offer of a job in furniture design came forth. During this period of collaboration with Le Corbusier and his cousin Pierre Jeanneret, she produced three of the most iconic chairs of the century. Meant for different aspects of sitting and relaxing, these chairs are still very much available and reproduced in great numbers.

After leaving the Le Corbusier studio, she worked with Jean Prouve’ the notable French designer also influenced by the use of metals.

 

The LC2 Grand Confort Chair.
The LC2 Grand Confort Chair, Charlotte Perriand, Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret, 1928.

 

B306 Chaise Lounge, 1928.
B306 Chaise Lounge, 1928.

 

B301 Reclining Chair, 1928.
B301 Reclining Chair, 1928.

 

She much admired work with tubular steel and industrial materials.

 

Dinning Room, Villa Church in Ville-d’Avray, Charlotte Perriand,1928.
Dining Room, Villa Church in Ville-d’Avray, Charlotte Perriand,1928.

 

Table Extensible, 1927.
Table Extensible, 1927.

 

La Maison du Jeune Homme, Exposition internationale de Bruxelles, 1935
La Maison du Jeune Homme, Exposition internationale de Bruxelles, Le Corbusier, Perriand, Jeanneret, 1935.

 

As France surrendered during World War II and the Germans entered Paris, Perriand left to go to Japan and help in raising the standards of design for the Japanese to make products for western consumption.

 

Charlotte Perriand In Japan, 1941.
Charlotte Perriand In Japan, 1941.

 

For more information on Charlotte Perriand, click on the image link below.

 

Encyclopedia Britannica Entry For Charlotte Perriand.
Encyclopedia Britannica Entry For Charlotte Perriand.

 

 

 

 




HBosler

Self-Portrait in Grey Watercolor.
Self-Portrait in Grey Watercolor.